Monthly Archive:: June 2012

Slow walking means slower thinking

Slow walking could be a sign of cognitive impairment. In a new study,older adults who walked slowly were nine times more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment than their more agile peers. The study from the journal Neurology

Coffee could prevent dementia

Coffee can provide a little more than your morning jolt of energy. A growing body of research suggests that drinking coffee could lower your risk of Alzheimer’s disease. The latest study suggests that drinking several cups a

Weather doesn’t affect fibromyalgia

A drop in temperatures, a burst of rain and suddenly your body is aching. Patients with fibromyalgia frequently complain of worsening symptoms with changes in weather. But to what extent does weather predict worsening symptoms? Not much,

How to treat infants with headache

A baby’s cries can take more than milk or a diaper change to soothe. Persistent crying could be sign of infant headache. Diagnosing headache is challenging since babies lack the words to communicate their pain. A 2009

Tai chi relieves fibromyalgia, chronic pain

Easing your mind and muscles could ease chronic pain. A new study demonstrates that tai chi can significantly relieve fibromyalgia symptoms. Although previous research has pointed to the benefits of tai chi for fibromyalgia, few studies have

Dark Chocolate: Good for your sweetheart and your heart

Getting chocolate from a sweetheart could benefit your romance and your heart. A new study suggests that dark chocolate can help prevent heart problems. At an estimated annual cost of $42 a person, dark chocolate could reduce

Is one type of spinal pain more debilitating than the next?

Suffering from a combination of neck pain and sciatica may prove more debilitating than back pain alone. Although previous research has examined the economic impact of back and neck pain on employees, most studies have evaluated each condition

Prediabetes increases stroke risk

Prediabetes may contribute to stroke risk but that depends largely on how prediabetes is defined, the authors of a new meta-analysis pointed out in the British Medical Journal. Since definitions of prediabetes vary, it’s difficult to determine